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xboxIcon 3. Install a mods chip

All mods-chips are more or less equal! I mean that some special restriction, like DVD region, macrovision, disk eject, run signed code (from M$ or 3rd party game company) or unsigned code (Linux, softwares and emulators) etc... are not controlled by the mod-chip itself but only by the BIOS (Basic Input Output System, this small program is responsibe for initializing devices, starting a kernel, and low level operations)...So what?
Differences are:

  • Ease of installation (soldering may be required or not), 1st generation of chips (2000) use to have more than 50 cables, 2rd generation less than 15 cables and 3rd most of the time no soldering.
  • Onboard memory size (up to 2Mb for the latest generation) and number of BIOS you can store (up to 6 with different memory mapping : 6 bios of 256kb or 2 bios of 512kb and 4 of 256kb ....)
  • The way you can flash a new BIOS (printer LPT port or USB or through the dashboard with a CD).
  • Possibility of extension: like adding a LCD panel (Xenium).

Price range is from $20 (soldering required and only one bios like the Aladin) to $60 (2Mb, USB, 6 bios, LCD) for the most expensive.

I choose the Xbit because:
  • Xbit is Solderless (for all XBOX versions from 1.0 to 1.5): All You have to do is to position the chip correctly, and use 1 screw...In fact the double row of pogo pins (pins wih springs) are postionning the chip nearly alone.
  • Xbit accept BIOS up to 2Mb, you can have many bios in the onboard memory (6 memory mapping) and chose the one you prefer with dip-switches (6 configurations)
  • Has a USB interface while other has LPT or none (Some of them even sold the LPT bios loader separatly)

Xecuter 3.0 was my first choice but it was not available at that time

All manufacturer have great HowTo sections, for Xbit just follow instructions here:
http://www.dms3.com/xmanuals.htm
http://www.dms3.com/xbit_pogopin_install.htm