Keyboard Shortcuts

Files

Control-NNew file.
Control-OOpen file.
Control-WClose buffer.
Control-E Control-WClose all buffers.
Control-SSave buffer.
Control-E Control-SSave all buffers.
Control-PPrint buffer.
Control-Page UpGo to previous buffer.
Control-Page DownGo to next buffer.
Control-`Go to recent buffer.
Control-QExit jEdit.

Views

Control-E Control-TTurn gutter (line numbering) on and off.
Control-2Split view horizontally.
Control-3Split view vertically.
Control-1Unsplit.
Alt-Page UpSend keyboard focus to previous text area.
Alt-Page DownSend keyboard focus to next text area.
Control-E Control-Up; Control-Left; Control-Down; Control-RightSend keyboard focus to top; bottom; left; right docking area.
Control-E Control-`Close currently focused docking area.
Control-E Control-ESend keyboard focus back to current text area.

Repeating

Control-EnternumbercommandRepeat the command (it can be a keystroke, menu item selection or tool bar click) the specified number of times.

Moving the Caret

ArrowMove caret one character or line.
Control-ArrowMove caret one word or paragraph.
Page Up; Page DownMove caret one screenful.
HomeFirst non-whitespace character of line, beginning of line, first visible line (repeated presses).
EndLast non-whitespace character of line, end of line, last visible line (repeated presses).
Control-HomeBeginning of buffer.
Control-EndEnd of buffer.
Control-]Go to matching bracket.
Control-E Control-[; Control-]Go to previous; next bracket.
Control-LGo to line.

Selecting Text

Shift-ArrowExtend selection by one character or line.
Control-Shift-ArrowExtend selection by one word or paragraph.
Shift-Page Up; Shift-Page DownExtend selection by one screenful.
Shift-HomeExtend selection to first non-whitespace character of line, beginning of line, first visible line (repeated presses).
Shift-EndExtend selection to last non-whitespace character of line, end of line, last visible line (repeated presses).
Control-Shift-HomeExtend selection to beginning of buffer.
Control-Shift-EndExtend selection to end of buffer.
Control-[Select code block.
Control-E W; L; PSelect word; line; paragraph.
Control-E Control-LSelect line range.
Control-\Switch between single and multiple selection mode.

Scrolling

Control-E Control-JCenter current line on screen.
Control-E Control-ICenter caret on screen.
Control-'; Control-/Scroll up; down one line.
Alt-'; Alt-/Scroll up; down one page.

Text Editing

Control-ZUndo.
Control-E Control-ZRedo.
Backspace; DeleteDelete character before; after caret.
Control-Backspace; Control-DeleteDelete word before; after caret.
Control-D; Control-E DDelete line; paragraph.
Control-Shift-Backspace; Control-Shift-DeleteDelete from caret to beginning; end of line.
Control-E RRemove trailing whitespace from the current line (or all selected lines).
Control-JJoin lines.
Control-BComplete word.
Control-E FFormat paragraph (or selection).

Clipboard and Registers

Control-X or Shift-DeleteCut selected text to clipboard.
Control-C or Control-InsertCopy selected text to clipboard.
Control-E Control-UAppend selected text to clipboard, removing it from the buffer.
Control-E Control-AAppend selected text to clipboard, leaving it in the buffer.
Control-V or Shift-InsertPaste clipboard contents.
Control-E Control-PVertical paste clipboard contents.
Control-R Control-X keyCut selected text to register key.
Control-R Control-C keyCopy selected text to register key.
Control-R Control-U keyAppend selected text to register key, removing it from the buffer.
Control-R Control-A keyAppend selected text to register key, leaving it in the buffer.
Control-R Control-V keyPaste contents of register key.
Control-R Control-P keyVertically paste contents of register key.
Control-E Control-VPaste previous.

Markers

Control-E Control-MIf current line doesn't contain a marker, one will be added. Otherwise, the existing marker will be removed. Use the Markers menu to return to markers added in this manner.
Control-T keyAdd marker with shortcut key.
Control-Y keyGo to marker with shortcut key.
Control-U keySelect to marker with shortcut key.
Control-K keyGo to marker with shortcut key, and move the marker to the previous caret position.
Control-E Control-,; Control-.Move caret to previous; next marker.

Search and Replace

Control-FOpen search and replace dialog box.
Control-GFind next.
Control-HFind previous.
Control-E Control-BSearch in open buffers.
Control-E Control-DSearch in directory.
Control-E Control-RReplace in selection.
Control-E Control-GReplace in selection and find next.
Control-,Incremental search.
Control-.Quick HyperSearch.
Alt-,Incremental search for word under the caret.
Alt-.Quick HyperSearch for word under the caret.

Source Code Editing

Control-;Expand abbreviation.
Alt-Left; Alt-RightShift current line (or all selected lines) left; right.
Shift-Tab; TabShift selected lines left; right. Note that pressing Tab with no selection active will insert a tab character at the caret position.
Control-IIndent current line (or all selected lines).
Control-E Control-CWing comment selection.
Control-E Control-BBox comment selection.

Folding and Narrowing

Alt-BackspaceCollapse fold containing caret.
Alt-EnterExpand fold containing caret one level only.
Alt-Shift-EnterExpand fold containing caret fully.
Control-E XExpand all folds.
Control-E AAdd explicit fold.
Control-E SSelect fold.
Control-E Enter keyExpand folds with level less than key, collapse all others.
Control-E N NNarrow to fold.
Control-E N SNarrow to selection.
Alt-Up Alt-DownMoves caret to previous; next fold.
Control-E UMoves caret to the fold containing the one at the caret position.

Macros

Control-M Control-RRecord macro.
Control-M Control-MRecord temporary macro.
Control-M Control-SStop recording.
Control-M Control-PRun temporary macro.
Control-M Control-LRun most recently played or recorded macro.

Alternative Shortcuts

A few frequently-used commands have alternative shortcuts intended to help you keep your hands from moving all over the keyboard.

Alt-J; Alt-LMove caret to previous, next character.
Alt-I; Alt-KMove caret up, down one line.
Alt-Q; Alt-AMove caret up, down one screenful.
Alt-ZFirst non-whitespace character of line, beginning of line, first visible line (repeated presses).
Alt-XLast non-whitespace character of line, end of line, last visible line (repeated presses).

Glob Patterns

jEdit uses glob patterns similar to those in the various Unix shells to implement file name filters in the file system browser. Glob patterns resemble regular expressions somewhat, but have a much simpler syntax. The following character sequences have special meaning within a glob pattern:

  • ? matches any one character
  • * matches any number of characters
  • {!glob} Matches anything that does not match glob
  • {a,b,c} matches any one of a, b or c
  • [abc] matches any character in the set a, b or c
  • [^abc] matches any character not in the set a, b or c
  • [a-z] matches any character in the range a to z, inclusive. A leading or trailing dash will be interpreted literally

In addition to the above, a number of "character class expressions" may be used as well:

  • [[:alnum:]] matches any alphanumeric character
  • [[:alpha:]] matches any alphabetical character
  • [[:blank:]] matches a space or horizontal tab
  • [[:cntrl:]] matches a control character
  • [[:digit:]] matches a decimal digit
  • [[:graph:]] matches a non-space, non-control character
  • [[:lower:]] matches a lowercase letter
  • [[:print:]] same as [:graph:], but also space and tab
  • [[:punct:]] matches a punctuation character
  • [[:space:]] matches any whitespace character, including newlines
  • [[:upper:]] matches an uppercase letter
  • [[:xdigit:]] matches a valid hexadecimal digit

Here are some examples of glob patterns:

  • * - all files
  • *.java - all files whose names end with ".java"
  • *.{c,h} - all files whose names end with either ".c" or ".h"
  • *[^~] - all files whose names do not end with "~"

 Regular Expressions

jEdit uses regular expressions to implement inexact search and replace. A regular expression consists of a string where some characters are given special meaning with regard to pattern matching.

Within a regular expression, the following characters have special meaning:

Positional Operators

  • ^ matches at the beginning of a line
  • $ matches at the end of a line
  • \b matches at a word break
  • \B matches at a non-word break
  • \< matches at the start of a word
  • \> matches at the end of a word

One-Character Operators

  • . matches any single character
  • \d matches any decimal digit
  • \D matches any non-digit
  • \n matches the newline character
  • \s matches any whitespace character
  • \S matches any non-whitespace character
  • \t matches a horizontal tab character
  • \w matches any word (alphanumeric) character
  • \W matches any non-word (alphanumeric) character
  • \\ matches the backslash ("\") character

Character Class Operator

  • [abc] matches any character in the set a, b or c
  • [^abc] matches any character not in the set a, b or c
  • [a-z] matches any character in the range a to z, inclusive. A leading or trailing dash will be interpreted literally
  • [[:alnum:]] matches any alphanumeric character
  • [[:alpha:]] matches any alphabetical character
  • [[:blank:]] matches a space or horizontal tab
  • [[:cntrl:]] matches a control character
  • [[:digit:]] matches a decimal digit
  • [[:graph:]] matches a non-space, non-control character
  • [[:lower:]] matches a lowercase letter
  • [[:print:]] same as [:graph:], but also space and tab
  • [[:punct:]] matches a punctuation character
  • [[:space:]] matches any whitespace character, including newlines
  • [[:upper:]] matches an uppercase letter
  • [[:xdigit:]] matches a valid hexadecimal digit

Subexpressions and Backreferences

  • (abc) matches whatever the expression abc would match, and saves it as a subexpression. Also used for grouping
  • (?:...) pure grouping operator, does not save contents
  • (?#...) embedded comment, ignored by engine
  • (?=...) positive lookahead; the regular expression will match if the text in the brackets matches, but that text will not be considered part of the match
  • (?!...) negative lookahead; the regular expression will match if the text in the brackets does not match, and that text will not be considered part of the match
  • \n where 0 < n < 10, matches the same thing the nth subexpression matched. Can only be used in the search string
  • $n where 0 < n < 10, substituted with the text matched by the nth subexpression. Can only be used in the replacement string

Branching (Alternation) Operator

  • a|b matches whatever the expression a would match, or whatever the expression b would match.

Repeating Operators

These symbols operate on the previous atomic expression.

  • ? matches the preceding expression or the null string
  • * matches the null string or any number of repetitions of the preceding expression
  • + matches one or more repetitions of the preceding expression
  • {m} matches exactly m repetitions of the one-character expression
  • {m,n} matches between m and n repetitions of the preceding expression, inclusive
  • {m,} matches m or more repetitions of the preceding expression

Stingy (Minimal) Matching

If a repeating operator (above) is immediately followed by a ?, the repeating operator will stop at the smallest number of repetitions that can complete the rest of the match.

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